slide1

    09001c: Protecting nesting sites of the Carnaby's black-cockatoo

    The endangered Carnaby's black-cockatoo is found only in the south-west corner of WA. Their success in breeding depends on the availability of feeding habitat within 12 km of nesting sites. Courtesy  Rick Dawson, Department of Environment and Conservation
    The endangered Carnaby's black-cockatoo is found only in the south-west corner of WA. Their success in breeding depends on the availability of feeding habitat within 12 km of nesting sites. Courtesy Rick Dawson, Department of Environment and Conservation

    It takes more than 100 years to create a tree hollow suitable for a nesting Carnaby's black-cockatoo. Clearing and fragmentation of remnant vegetation throughout the south-west of WA is threatening the survival of the cockatoo by reducing nesting sites and limiting the availability of food.

    With funding from the State NRM Program, the Department of Environment and Conservation surveyed feeding, roosting and nesting sites of the cockatoo, and mapped and assessed the success of artificial nest boxes.

    Fact sheets to guide the design, installation and maintenance of artificial nest boxes and the planting and management of vegetation for the benefit of the cockatoos were produced.

    The aims of the project were to:

    • identify habitat critical to the survival of the cockatoo
    • provide the government and community with information on how nesting, roosting and feeding sites can be enhanced to preserve the cockatoo.
    Investment: $ 250 000
    Delivery organisation: Department of Environment and Conservation
    Project duration: January 2010 - June 2010
    Location: Swan and Avon NRM regions, with an emphasis on the Swan Coastal Plain

    Major project achievements

    • Nesting, roosting and feeding sites of Carnaby's cockatoos throughout the Swan Coastal Plain and Avon NRM region surveyed
    • List of priority sites identified.
    • Critical habitat that would benefit from further protection or rehabilitation identified.
    • More than 300 (311) artificial nest hollows located and assessed.
    • Three fact sheets produced to guide the use, design, placement, monitoring and management of artificial nest hollows for Carnaby's cockatoos.
    • Detailed advice on the best range of native and exotic plants that can be used in remedial plantings for the benefit of Carnaby's cockatoo, and the management of these plantings, published in an interactive search tool on the department's website.

    Project partners

    Birds Australia, Western Australian Museum

    More information

    Return to previous page