slide1

    09001d: Critical habitat mapping for Carnaby’s cockatoo for use in planning and development decision-making

    Carnaby’s black-cockatoo drinking from a water dish opposite Manning Lake in Hamilton Hill. Courtesy Chris Owen
    Carnaby’s black-cockatoo drinking from a water dish opposite Manning Lake in Hamilton Hill. Courtesy Chris Owen

    With funding from the State NRM Program, the Department of Planning mapped habitat critical to the survival of Carnaby's black-cockatoo, a species of national environmental significance. These maps were cross-referenced with maps of approved land zonings to identify areas of possible land-use conflict.

    Mapping initially focused on Carnaby's black-cockatoo and aimed to alert government and developers to potential land-use conflicts at the earliest possible stage, acting as a conservation and land-use planning tool.

    Priority areas highlighted by the project will be used to develop lists of areas for research and habitat conservation that could be funded as part of future development offset packages and bio-banking.

    Investment: $ 76 140
    In-kind contribution: $ 105 000
    Delivery organisation: Department of Planning
    Project duration: January 2010 - February 2011
    Location: Swan Coastal Plain – Gingin to Bunbury

    Major project achievements

    • Maps developed depicting likely Carnaby's cockatoo nesting, feeding and roosting habitat for key areas of the Swan Coastal Plain and outer regions to Gingin and Dunsborough.
    • Maps showing areas of critical cockatoo habitat intersected with approved and proposed land development to identify areas of likely land-use conflict.
    • Areas identified of likely land-use conflict between critical habitat and approved land zonings and development.
    • List created of research and habitat conservation areas that could potentially be funded as part of future development offset packages.

    Project partners

    Western Australian Planning Commission; Department of Environment and Conservation; local governments; Office of Environmental Protection Authority; WWF Australia; Birds Australia; (Commonwealth) Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities; Western Australian Museum; Western Australian Local Government Association; and universities

    More information

    Return to previous page