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    09021: Urgent recovery actions for endangered Flora

    New populations of critically endangered prickly honeysuckle (Lambertia echinata) have been established as part of this project. Courtesy Department of Environment and Conservation
    New populations of critically endangered prickly honeysuckle (Lambertia echinata) have been established as part of this project. Courtesy Department of Environment and Conservation

    Western Australia's unique flora is a highly prized asset for both its biodiversity and potential commercial value. An estimated 400 WA plant species and subspecies are listed as rare under theWildlife Conservation Act 1950 and many of these are in an overall state of decline.

    With funding from the State NRM Program, the Department of Environment and Conservation implemented works to save 15 critically endangered plant species.

    Investment: $ 424 000
    In-kind contribution: $ 63 200
    Delivery organisation: Department of Environment and Conservation
    Project duration: October 2009 - October 2010
    Location: South-west WA

    Major project achievements

    • More than 5000 (5312) seeds cleaned, treated and germinated at the Threatened Flora Seed Centre and established at the Kings Park and Botanical Garden (KPBG) nursery.
    • Fifteen populations of critically endangered plant species established using seedlings from the nursery. Species are Acacia aprica, Acacia awestoniana, Acacia imitans, Acacia unguicula, Acacia cochlocarpa subsp. cochlocarpa, Banksia ionthocarpa subsp. ionthocarpa, Daviesia glossosema, Daviesia pseudaphylla, Eremophila nivea, Grevillea calliantha, Grevillea humifusa, Lambertia echinata subsp. echinata, Lambertia orbifolia subsp. orbifolia and Persoonia micranthera.
    • One existing translocated population of Grevillea acropogonmore than doubled in size through enhancement planting.
    • Translocation workshop, coordinated by the Australian Network for Plant Conservation, held in February 2010 with 50 attendees from state government, regional NRM groups, environmental consultancy groups, industry and landholders.
    • Interpretive path and signage installed at the Acacia awestoniana translocation site.
    • University of Western Australia PhD project initiated on ecophysiology of translocated plants Banksia ionthocarpa subsp. ionthocarpa and Acacia awestoniana.

    Project partners

    University of Western Australia; Kings Park and Botanical Garden; Australian Network for Plant Conservation; Esperance Wildflower Society; Albany Wildflower Society; Australian Wildlife Conservancy

    More information

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