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    09024: Rehabilitating urban habitat of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo

    Carnaby’s black-cockatoo chicks in an artificial nesting hollow. Courtesy Christine Groom, Department of Environment and Conservation
    Carnaby’s black-cockatoo chicks in an artificial nesting hollow. Courtesy Christine Groom, Department of Environment and Conservation

    The endangered Carnaby's black-cockatoo is found only in the south-west corner of WA. Populations of the cockatoos have declined by more than 50 per cent over the past 45 years, mainly due to:

    • habitat loss
    • poaching
    • invasive species.

    Carnaby's are an important indicator for the survival of many other plant and animal species that share the same habitat. If these habitats are lost, not only will Carnaby's cockatoo face extinction, but also the many other species that depend on the same habitats.

    With funding from the State NRM Program, the following three organisations are working together to protect and enhance habitat important to the survival of the cockatoo through this project:

    • Department of Environment and Conservation
    • Department of Planning
    • Birds Australia.

    In particular, the project will rehabilitate degraded habitat sites, and analyse and map feeding, roosting and breeding sites.

    Investment: $ 440 000
    In-kind contribution: $ 91 500
    Delivery organisation: Department of Planning and Department of Environment and Conservation
    Project duration: October 2009 - September 2012
    Location: WA wheatbelt, and Swan and South Coast NRM regions, with an emphasis on the Swan Coastal Plain (Gingin–Bunbury)

    Major project achievements

    • Surveys of critical habitat for Carnaby's cockatoo were undertaken in the wheatbelt, and potential private property sites identified for habitat management action.
    • Fencing work was completed at 14 sites (on nine properties) identified in the wheatbelt survey, protecting 570 ha of Carnaby's cockatoo habitat.
    • Nine property management plans were prepared for properties that participated in fencing works, protecting 30 bushland sites totalling 1981 ha.
    • The 2010 and 2011 Great Cocky Counts were undertaken; results are available on the DEC Carnaby's cockatoo website.
    • A new Recovery Plan for Carnaby's Cockatoo was endorsed.
    • Four hectares of Carnaby's cockatoo habitat was rehabilitated during community and corporate planting days (3 ha at Whiteman Park, and 1 ha at Mirrabooka).
    • Historic Carnaby's cockatoo observation data was extracted and captured electronically for use in habitat mapping.

    Project partners

    BirdLife Australia; volunteers and landowners

    More information

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