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    09027a: Invasive species strategy for WA: starling control

    The government goes to great lengths to keep the common starling on the other side of the border. Courtesy Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia
    The government goes to great lengths to keep the common starling on the other side of the border. Courtesy Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia

    Starlings are listed as one of the world's worst invasive alien species, and have been likened to 'cane toads with wings'. They are considered an extreme threat to agriculture, the environment and the community.

    Flocks of starling damage fruit from orchards, diminish crops, eat and foul food meant for livestock, produce waste that may ruin human water supplies, spread weeds and displace native species.

    Starlings are present to the east of the WA border, and ongoing surveillance, trapping and culling is being undertaken by the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia to reduce populations and limit the further spread of the species.

    The aim of this project is to enhance surveillance, trapping, shooting and nest removal of starlings from the South Coast region of Western Australia, with the view to eradication.

    Investment: $ 400 000
    Delivery organisation: Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia
    Project duration: December 2009 - March 2011
    Location: South Coast region

    Major project achievements

    • More than 500 000 ha surveyed for starling infestation.
    • More than 100 (105) starlings removed from the South Coast region in 2009-10 and two in 2010-11.
    • Surveillance and control activities have successfully reduced the infestation to just 2.2 per cent of the South-West Land Division, from a high of 7.4 per cent in 2006-07.

    More information

    If you see a starling, report it to the Pest and Disease Information Service on free call 1800 084 881.

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