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    09030: Protecting south-west national parks from dieback

    Liquid and granular metam-sodium was used as a soil fumigant to eliminate Phytophthora along a telegraph track in Cape Arid National Park. Courtesy Renee Hartley, Department of Environment and Conservation
    Liquid and granular metam-sodium was used as a soil fumigant to eliminate Phytophthora along a telegraph track in Cape Arid National Park. Courtesy Renee Hartley, Department of Environment and Conservation

    Fitzgerald River, Cape Arid and Lesueur national parks constitute more than 630 000 ha of the estimated one million hectares currently under imminent threat of infestation by dieback in WA.

    Dieback has devastated much of the south-west and is now threatening the biodiversity and ecosystems of these high-priority conservation reserves.

    The Department of Environment and Conservation used a range of risk reduction and community engagement strategies to reduce the threat of dieback infestation in these national parks. Small infestations already present in the parks were contained and eradicated.

    Investment: $ 1 610 000
    In-kind contribution: $ 94 337
    Other contribution: $ 250 000
    Delivery organisation: Department of Environment and Conservation
    Project duration: January 2010 - September 2011
    Location: Fitzgerald River, Lesueur and Cape Arid national parks and surrounding areas

    Major project achievements

    • Dieback Atlas dataset updated with high confidence data. This data is invaluable for understanding the threat posed by dieback, targeting management activities and for future monitoring in the parks.
    • One dieback infestation eradicated and one infestation contained protecting more than 20 000 ha of healthy native plant communities.
    • New containment and eradication techniques developed for infestations within native plant communities.
    • Hygiene facilities upgraded and installed within Cape Arid, Fitzgerald River, LeGrand, Lesueur and Stokes national parks. This included installation of vehicle wash-down facilities, mobile wash-down trailers, boot-cleaning equipment, track closures and information signage.
    • Stakeholders in surrounding protection areas identified and engaged.
    • Efforts of government agencies, utilities, industry, local government, emergency services and the broader community coordinated through awareness raising, provision of training and the development of stakeholder-specific management tools. Overall, the project engaged 21 high-risk stakeholder organisations.
    • Best practice management tools developed including the Dieback Information and Delivery Management System (DIDMS), an interactive web-based GIS (geographic information system) decision-making tool that combines the Dieback Atlas dataset with management information, and an operational scale GIS-based management tool for emergency service organisations around Cape Arid National Park.

    Project partners

    South Coast NRM Inc; Dieback Working Group, Centre forPhytophthoraScience and Management; Main Roads WA; Fire and Emergency Services Authority (FESA); State Emergency Service; bushfire brigades within the Shire of Esperance; Western Power; APA Group; Dampier to Bunbury Natural Gas Pipeline; National Broadband Network-Visionstream; Northern Agricultural Catchments Council; University of WA/Kings Park and Botanical Garden; Fulton Holton; Department of Fisheries; private landholders around Lesueur National Park; Shire of Esperance; Shire of Jerramungup; Shire of Ravensthorpe; Shire of Coorow; Shire of Dandaragan; Esperance, Albany and Hopetoun schools; various community groups, including Friends of the Fitzgerald River National Park, the Fitzgerald Biosphere Group and the Ravensthorpe Area Initiative Network

    More information

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