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    09062: Carnaby’s black-cockatoo recovery

    Carnaby's black-cockatoo chicks. Success in breeding depends on the availability of feeding habitat within 12 km of nesting sites. Courtesy Christine Groom, Department of Environment and Conservation
    Carnaby's black-cockatoo chicks. Success in breeding depends on the availability of feeding habitat within 12 km of nesting sites. Courtesy Christine Groom, Department of Environment and Conservation

    Carnaby's black-cockatoo is a threatened species endemic to the south-west of WA.

    Between the 1970s and the 1990s, the species disappeared from more than one-third of its range, with both local extinctions and reduced density in occupied areas. Data from direct counts, estimates of the number of breeding females, and declines in the area of occupancy and quality of habitat, indicate that the population has declined by at least 50 per cent over the past three generations (45 years).

    This decline is predicted to continue in the presence of ongoing threats such as habitat loss and degradation, and competition from invasive animals.

    With the help of funding from the State NRM Program, Birds Australia is aiming to increase the area of cockatoo habitat managed to reduce critical threats throughout the wheatbelt. The project will direct oversee recovery actions such as improving the quality of nesting and foraging habitat through fencing to exclude stock, revegetation and pest control.

    Investment: $ 375 000
    Delivery organisation: Birds Australia
    Project duration: July 2010 - September 2012
    Location: Wheatbelt

    More information

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