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    09066: Developing strategic road reserve asset management plans to maximise biodiversity, land and water conservation outcomes by local government

    Pink pokers (Grevillea petrophiliodes) on Miling East Road, Dalwallinu. Courtesy Kylie Payne, Department of Environment and Conservation.
    Pink pokers (Grevillea petrophiliodes) on Miling East Road, Dalwallinu. Courtesy Kylie Payne, Department of Environment and Conservation.

    Local government plays an important role in seeking to balance infrastructure and community needs with environmental conservation and sustainability. These objectives sometimes conflict and local government currently has few tools and little support to resolve problems.

    In particular, local government plays an important role in the care, control and management of transport corridors, and the essential requirement of safe and well-maintained roads. Those same transport corridors are frequently also valuable environmental precincts.

    Road reserve asset management plans (RRAMPs) are one strategy for balancing road infrastructure-related activities with biodiversity conservation. The plans assist local government in asset planning and management at a local and regional scale and attempt to resolve conflict between conservation of native vegetation and infrastructure requirements.

    The plans also assist the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) to assess permit applications for clearing native vegetation. 

    With the help of funding from the State NRM Program, the Western Australian Local Government Association (WALGA) is creating a manual for producing RRAMPs.

    To support this, WALGA is running a joint communication campaign with the Native Vegetation Conservation Branch of DEC and the Roadside Conservation Committee. The aim is to ensure local governments know how to create RRAMPs and are fully cognisant of their obligations and opportunities under the clearing provisions of the Environmental Protection Act 1986.

    A study is also being conducted to determine the most suitable land-use planning instruments for achieving long-term protection of identified and strategically located offsets. The results of the study will be compiled into a 'toolkit'.

    Investment: $ 170 500
    In-kind contribution: $ 36 947
    Other contribution: $ 4 623
    Delivery organisation: Western Australian Local Government Association
    Project duration: July 2010 - September 2011
    Location: Shires of Esperance, Cuballing, Wickepin and Pingelly

    Major project achievements

    • Education of Local Government staff and Elected Members on how to create a RRAMP and their obligations and opportunities under the clearing provisions in theEnvironmental Protection Act1986.
    • A toolkit of land use planning tools and other mechanisms for long-term protection of offsets for conservation Toolkit, available to download from the WALGA website.
    • A generic series of steps (guidelines) for use by Local Government when preparing their own RRAMP's produced.

    Project partners

    Department of Environment and Conservation; Roadside Conservation Committee; Shire's of Esperance, Pingelly, Cuballing and Wickepin; Main Roads

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