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    09080: Managing fire and biodiversity conservation in the West Kimberley

    Dampier Peninsula’s rare monsoon vine thickets that occur in the extensive dune systems are under significant threat from late-season wildfires. Courtesy Environs Kimberley
    Dampier Peninsula’s rare monsoon vine thickets that occur in the extensive dune systems are under significant threat from late-season wildfires. Courtesy Environs Kimberley

    This project is focused on the extremely rare monsoon vine thickets and coastal wetlands in the Dampierland Bioregion. Monsoon vine thickets are listed as a threatened ecological community by the state, and some of the wetlands and groundwater-dependent ecosystems in Dampierland are also listed as threatened.

    These ecosystems are under significant threat from late-season wildfires. The intensity and frequency of these fires is increasing and causing significant floristic and structural change in the woodland habitat. Fire-sensitive vegetation is contracting and the flammability of the surrounding landscape is increasing.

    The project will deliver a monitoring and management program as well as an assessment of fire management activities that will be implemented over 2010-11 to assist in conserving and protecting these threatened ecological communities.

    Investment: $ 99 000
    In-kind contribution: $ 25 000
    Delivery organisation: Environs Kimberley
    Project duration: July 2010 - June 2012
    Location: Dampierland Bioregion, West Kimberley

    Major project achievements

    • Production of three types of maps for each of the 79 MVT patches; fire scarring, no. fire & vegetation cover change.

    • Information presented in a variety of ways to ensure a wider outreach and understanding to both professionals, the public and indigenous community members.

    • Monitoring protocols developed; new  knowledge enabled the ecosystem to be analysed and classed as nationally endangered.

    Lessons Learnt

    • Seasonal and weather constraints dictated monitoring.

    • Cooperative research and service agreements delayed the project but are highly necessary for future success of the projects.

    • Further delays were caused by lack of data and flora/fauna knowledge in the area.

     

    Project partners

    Environs Kimberly; Society for Kimberly Indigenous Plants and Animals; Broome Botanical Society; Rangelands NRM WA; Australian Quarantine Inspection Service; Conservation Volunteers Australia; Bardi Jawi Rangers; Bardi Jawi Oorany Rangers; Nyul Nyul Rangers; DEC Threatened Species Unit; CSIRO; University of Western Australia; Australian National University; Curtin University; Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority; South East Regional Centre for Urban Landcare; Cox Family - Gnylmarung Community; Middle Lagoon Community; Chile Creek Community; Kooljaman Resort; Bernadette Angus/Millagoon; Rangelands NRM WA; SERA Conference; Backroom Press.

    More information

    Environs Kimberley (08) 9192 1922 or envrkimb@broome.wt.com.au

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