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    09088: Miriuwung Gajerrong fire management

    Mosaic burning on Miriuwung Gajerrong lands. Courtesy Yawoorroong Miriuwung Gajerrong Yirrgeb Noong Dawang Aboriginal Corporation
    Mosaic burning on Miriuwung Gajerrong lands. Courtesy Yawoorroong Miriuwung Gajerrong Yirrgeb Noong Dawang Aboriginal Corporation

    The Miriuwung Gajerrong fire management project aims to establish a coordinated prescribed burning program, incorporating traditional Indigenous mosaic burning practices, on lands owned and jointly managed by the Miriuwung Gajerrong community.

    Mosaic burning is a system of using patches of small, low-intensity fires to sweep through the understorey of the bush. This type of burning reduces fuel loads and fuel continuity, thereby reducing the size and intensity of bushfires. It also enhances ecological diversity by creating a mosaic of different fire age-classes and habitats within a treated area.

    This project will apply the successful principles of reintroducing traditional mosaic fire practices of the Western Arnhem Land fire abatement project while replicating the coordinated burning program of the Mornington eco-fire project.

    The project will also build capacity of Indigenous ranger groups to be competent in fire management, and build working partnerships between Aboriginal communities, pastoralists and government departments for continued coordinated early drying season burning.

    Investment: $ 250 000
    In-kind contribution: $ 30 400
    Delivery organisation: Yawoorroong Miriuwung Gajerrong Yirrgeb Noog Dawang Aboriginal Corporation
    Project duration: July 2010 - December 2012
    Location: Miriuwung Gajerrong lands within 200 km radius of Kununurra

    Major project achievements

    • Maintenance of fire burning and fire break equipment.

    • Management plans (20) and MG Ranger education poster showcased at NAIDOC week promoting on-country MG ranger activities.

    • Rangers completed fire management training and relationship building with DEC rangers for reserve 31165.

    • Conducted second burning according to the fire management plan and improve on plans through results of second year burn and implementation.

    Lessons Learnt

    • Well thought out and analysed projects are the most successful.
    • Implementing native methods and inclusion of community rangers in development of fire plan was a requirement for success.

    Project partners

    MG Land and Water Aboriginal Rangers; MG Land and Water Project Officer; Department of Parks and Wildlife; Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife.

    More information

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