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    10001: Hand weeding and mapping environmental weeds in the Queens Park Regional Open Space Reserves

    Friends of Queens Park Bushland weed watsonia in Black Creek reserve. Courtesy Friends of Queens Park Bushland
    Friends of Queens Park Bushland weed watsonia in Black Creek reserve. Courtesy Friends of Queens Park Bushland

    Queens Park Regional Open Space includes Bush Forever sites 283 and 424, which contain threatened ecological communities, declared rare flora and priority flora. This bushland provides habitat to 100 recorded bird species, including the endangered Carnaby's black-cockatoo and migratory rainbow bee-eater as well as 14 reptile species.

    While the bushlands are fragmented and disturbed by weed invasion, a recent report, Flora and Fauna Assessment for Queens Park Regional Open Space (Ecoscape Pty Ltd, 2010), identified the vegetation condition in many areas as very good to excellent.

    With the help of State NRM Program funding, environmental weeds will be removed by hand from better vegetation condition areas in the threatened ecological communities. Hand weeding is best in areas with declared rare flora, priority flora and smaller herbs such as orchids, which are easily killed from overspray of poisons. Selective herbicide will be used in other areas to control grass.

    Maps of the distribution of priority weeds will also be produced to enhance the efficiency of this and future weed control projects.

    Investment: $ 30 400
    In-kind contribution: $ 8 581
    Other contribution: $ 20 895
    Delivery organisation: City of Canning; Friends of Queens Park Bushland
    Project duration: July 2011 - June 2012
    Location: Queens Park Regional Open Space, 11 km south-east of Perth in Queens Park, East Cannington and Welshpool

    Major project achievements

    • Manual and spray weeding was completed (Bridal Creeper, Watsonia, Geraldton Carnation Weed, Pink Gladiolus, Black Flag and other non-native grasses), was mostly successful.

    • Public walks were completed with new members attending.

    • Equipment purchased as to continue night stalks within the reserves.

    Lessons Learnt

    • Providing an incentive or subsidy (non-monetary) has a greater success in volunteer attendance and input.
    • Not all weeds are alike and a universal weed removal method cannot succeed, leading to weed removal not only being labour intensive but time consuming and difficult.

    Project partners

    City of Canning; Friends of Queens Park Bushland

    More information

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