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    10023: Improving habitat and connectivity in the farming landscape for birds in the Moore River catchment

    Incorporation of woody perennial vegetation into agricultural production systems provides habitat and links between areas of remnant vegetation, improving habitat value across the landscape. Courtesy Ingrid Krockenberger, Moore Catchment Council
    Incorporation of woody perennial vegetation into agricultural production systems provides habitat and links between areas of remnant vegetation, improving habitat value across the landscape. Courtesy Ingrid Krockenberger, Moore Catchment Council

    Recent fencing of remnant vegetation and revegetation in the Moore River catchment has contributed to protecting habitat and improving habitat condition. This project will monitor birdlife to demonstrate the effectiveness of fencing to improve habitat.

    Bird surveys are an excellent performance indicator of habitat value. In addition, landholders are often more likely to relate to the needs of birds (animal life) than to the needs of remnant vegetation (plant life).

    Taking the needs of birdlife into consideration serves the purpose of protecting both vegetation and less noticed but equally important animals. With the help of State NRM Program funding, this project will:

    • provide incentives for fencing and revegetation of strategic sites
    • produce a DVD, discussing the attributes of bird habitats on surveyed farms
    • encourage landholders to include biodiversity considerations in their land management decision making.
    Investment: $ 30 300
    Other contribution: $ 29 750
    Delivery organisation: Moore Catchment Council
    Project duration: November 2011 - September 2012
    Location: Sub-catchments in the central zone of the Moore River catchment, Northern Agricultural region

    Major project achievements

    • Project built onto previous work, providing new baseline data to demonstrate effectiveness of revegetation and strategic sites.

    • Two 'conservation-reliant' species, theWestern Thornbill and Grey Shrike-thrush, were detected within the 11-year old remnant.

    • Protection and revegetation of corridors that linked to larger areas of remnant vegetation.

    Lessons learnt

    • The importance of remnant vegetation and need to conserve is outlined within the project.

    • Necessity of more than just large reserves, implementing corridors adequate for species movement.

    • Long-term projects with continual support and funding enable successful projects.

     

    Project partners

    Moore Catchment Council; Landholder; Community Volunteers.

    More information

    Moore Catchment Council  or (08) 9653 1355

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