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    10049: Implementation of the Oyster Harbour Fish Traps Management Plan

    Remnants of one of 60 sets of historical fish traps (or weirs) created by the Menang people of the Albany district. Courtesy State NRM Office.
    Remnants of one of 60 sets of historical fish traps (or weirs) created by the Menang people of the Albany district. Courtesy State NRM Office.

    Remnants of about 60 historical fish traps (or weirs) are located along the south coast of WA.

    The crescent shaped stone traps are only visible at low tide and are designed to capture fish as the tide rises and falls.

    The traps are recognised as culturally significant to the Menang people of Albany and are documented in the Registry of Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Sites maintained by the Department of Indigenous Affairs.

    Many of the fish traps are inaccessible and protected by isolation but those located in the heart of Oyster Harbour are at risk of damage from recreational activities.

    This project will implement the Oyster Harbour Fish Trap Management and Interpretive Plan to protect and restore fish traps in the harbour. It is one of the first Aboriginal sites to be developed within the framework of the proposed Kinjarling Trail 'Place of Rain' and one of the first to be protected and enhanced with interpretive signs to help increase Aboriginal tourism.

    Investment: $ 50 000
    Delivery organisation: Albany Heritage Reference Group Aboriginal Corporation
    Project duration: June 2012 - September 2013
    Location: Fish traps between the King and Kalgan rivers on the northern shore of Oyster Harbour, Albany
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