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    11024: Replacing 25 acres of northern jarrah forest for black cockatoo food source and roosting habitats

    Volunteers planting seedlings as part of restoration works. Courtesy Phil Digney Black Cockatoo Rehabilitation Centre (Kaarakin).
    Volunteers planting seedlings as part of restoration works. Courtesy Phil Digney Black Cockatoo Rehabilitation Centre (Kaarakin).

    Classified as a global biodiversity hotspot and the only Mediterranean climate tall forest in the world, Western Australia's unique northern jarrah forest is experiencing a catastrophic collapse.

    The jarrah forest supports a wide variety of threatened and endangered species including three species of black cockatoo (Baudins, Carnabys and Forest Red Tails). Carnabys and Baudins cockatoos are classified as 'endangered - likely to become extinct'. Other species that are either locally extinct or severely threatened include the Numbat, Quokka and Western quoll.

    Historical clearing and deforestation events, localised climate change, drought and disease have all contributed to the sudden decline of this forest with many thousands of hectares moving beyond the threshold of recovery.

    This project aims to restore a portion of the forest within the Banywola Regional Park in the Perth suburb of Martin. The project site is an abandoned fruit orchard occupying 25 acres, with a natural groundwater soak and waterway.

    Project activities will include:

    • weed eradication
    • ground preparation
    • seed broadcasting
    • tree and undergrowth species planting
    • wetland restoration
    • rabbit control
    Investment: $ 40 000
    Delivery organisation: The Black Cockatoo Preservation Society
    Project duration: January 2012 - December 2013
    Location: Banywola Regional Park
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