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    11050: Wild dog management to protect the Esperance farming region

    Map showing the extent of wild dog baiting along the boundary between agricultural tenure and unallocated crown land, north of Esperence. Courtesy Peter Harkness, Northern Mallee Declared Species Group.
    Map showing the extent of wild dog baiting along the boundary between agricultural tenure and unallocated crown land, north of Esperence. Courtesy Peter Harkness, Northern Mallee Declared Species Group.

    Wild dog's impact heavily on livestock producers and native fauna.

    Many producers in the Esperance region have gone away from farming stock due to wild dog attacks.

    This project aims to control the number of wild dogs in the Esperance farming region and to create an environment where producers can confidently diversify their farming program and get back into livestock production enterprises.

    The Northern Mallee Declared Species Group represents the Esperance farming community for the control of wild dogs around the 700 km boundary between agricultural tenure and unallocated crown land.

    With strategic and best practice management a steady decrease in the number of stock attacks has occurred over the past three years. Strategies to control the dogs include the use of aerial and ground baiting and trapping.

    This project will ensure the continuity of these control strategies by engaging a professional dogger and by delivering 4000 baits (by air and ground) to 20 000 ha along the boundary of the agricultural area.

    Investment: $ 40 000
    Delivery organisation: Northern Mallee Declared Species Group
    Project duration: March 2012 - June 2013
    Location: Esperance farming region
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