slide1

    11059: Phytophthora dieback assessment and management in Ambergate Reserve

    One of eight boot cleaning stations installed throughout Ambergate Reserve to help prevent the spread of dieback. Courtesy Mathilde Breton, City of Busselton.
    One of eight boot cleaning stations installed throughout Ambergate Reserve to help prevent the spread of dieback. Courtesy Mathilde Breton, City of Busselton.

    Ambergate Reserve is a 75 hectare remnant of high quality native vegetation located 9 kilometres south of Busselton. It is one of the most popular reserves in the City of Busselton for bushwalking and observing wildflowers, and is regularly visited by locals, school children and tourists.

    The reserve has high regional conservation value, with its rich floral diversity and three threatened ecological communities, five species of declared rare flora and six species of priority listed flora.

    Surrounded by cleared farm land, the reserve also plays a crucial role in providing a refuge and stepping stone for many species of fauna, including mammals, birds, insects and reptiles.

    This project is a partnership between the Busselton Naturalists Club, the Busselton Dieback Working Group and the City of Busselton to map the extent of Phytophthora dieback in Ambergate Reserve.

    Findings of the dieback survey will be used to treat infested and vulnerable vegetation with Phosphite. Boot cleaning stations and interpretative signage will also be installed at selected locations and remaining sections of a four kilometre walk trail will be covered with limestone to further reduce the risk of spreading the disease.

    Investment: $ 15 000
    In-kind contribution: $ 15 225
    Delivery organisation: City of Busselton
    Project duration: January 2013 - August 2012
    Location: Ambergate Reserve is located 9 kilometres south of the Busselton

    Major project achievements

    • Extent of Phytophthora dieback mapped throughout the 75 hectares reserve.
    • Eight interpretative signs installed.
    • Eight boot cleaning stations installed.
    • 43 000 square meters of infested and vulnerable vegetation treated with Phosphite.
    • 500 metres of walk path covered with limestone.

    Project partners

    Busselton Naturalists Club; Busselton Dieback Working Group; Department of Environment and Conservation

    More information

    Return to previous page