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    11062: Controlling animal movements onto Lake MacLeod

    A grazing management yard was constructed to move goats off Lake MacLeod. Courtesy Alex Harper, Project Development and Management for Regional WA.
    A grazing management yard was constructed to move goats off Lake MacLeod. Courtesy Alex Harper, Project Development and Management for Regional WA.

    Lake MacLeod is the westernmost lake in Australia, stretching over 1500 square kilometres adjacent to the coast between Carnarvon and Coral Bay.

    The predominately dry and saline lake is episodically flooded by the Lyndon and Minilya rivers, and other tributaries.

    Lake MacLeod is listed in "A Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia" and supports Australia's largest inland community of mangroves. It is also one of the most important sites for migratory shorebirds in Australia.

    A key threat to the health and biodiversity of Lake MacLeod is damage caused by uncontrolled stock and feral animals.

    This project will address this threat by:

    • moving stock watering points away from the lake and its tributaries
    • installing fencing to prevent stock access
    • installing a grazing management yard to move goats off the lake

    The four pastoral stations involved in this project are key stakeholders on a management advisory committee with Rio Tinto to manage Lake MacLeod.

    Investment: $ 22 000
    Delivery organisation: Lyndon Land Conservation District Committee
    Project duration: March 2012 - October 2012
    Location: Lake MacLeod is situated in the Gascoyne region just north of Carnarvon
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