slide1

    11063: Strategic and cooperative control of weed species on Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary

    Invasive weed Parkinsonia out-competes native species, chokes wetlands and creates impenetrable thickets. Courtesy Patric Lawler, Australian Wildlife Conservancy
    Invasive weed Parkinsonia out-competes native species, chokes wetlands and creates impenetrable thickets. Courtesy Patric Lawler, Australian Wildlife Conservancy

    Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary in the central Kimberley is a 320 668 hectare private conservation reserve owned and managed by the Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC).

    The sanctuary is part of the national reserve system and protects a number of threatened species such as Gouldian finches, Northern quolls and Purple-crowned fairy-wrens.

    This project aims to minimise the distribution and abundance of two weed species (Parkinsonia and Calotropis) across key sub-catchments in Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary and neighbouring properties.

    Parkinsonia aculeata is a branched spreading tree native to South America. In Australia, it out-competes native species, chokes wetlands and creates impenetrable thickets.

    Calotropis procera is a medium sized shrub, native to Africa and Asia which can become common where disturbance has removed native grasses.

    In some sub-catchments of the project area, both species have had their numbers greatly reduced through active control by AWC staff and a team of indigenous community members. This project will:

    • conduct follow up control in areas already largely cleared of these weeds
    • extend the control measures to other sub-catchments of the Fitzroy River
    Investment: $ 30 600
    Delivery organisation: Australian Wildlife Conservancy
    Project duration: April 2012 - December 2013
    Location: Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary in the central Kimberley

    More information

    Return to previous page