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    11066: Protecting threatened species on Faure Island in World Heritage listed Shark Bay

    Fire breaks were created around large infestations of Buffel grass to isolate wildfires and protect existing native vegetation from the invasive weed. Courtesy Phil Scully, Australian Wildlife Conservancy.
    Fire breaks were created around large infestations of Buffel grass to isolate wildfires and protect existing native vegetation from the invasive weed. Courtesy Phil Scully, Australian Wildlife Conservancy.

    Faure Island, in World Heritage listed Shark Bay, is owned and managed by the Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC).  AWC has transformed the 5 300 hectare island by removing feral cats and goats, reducing stock numbers, and reintroducing five nationally threatened mammal species: Burrowing bettongs, Shark Bay mice, Banded-hare wallabies and Western barred bandicoots. 

    Faure Island is now a wildlife sanctuary of national significance.

    Several weed species are present on the island. The most potentially serious weed is Buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris), which is distributed in patches throughout the island. Buffel grass presents a substantial fire hazard due to its large mass, and the way it fills 'spaces' between native shrubs. Extensive fires could have catastrophic consequences for the threatened mammal populations on the island.

    This project will spray and clear fire breaks around large infestations of Buffel grass to isolate any wildfires and protect the existing native habitat.

    AWC staff and volunteers will be utilised in this program.

    Investment: $ 12 460
    Delivery organisation: Australian Wildlife Conservancy – Karakamia Wildlife Sanctuary
    Project duration: March 2012 - March 2013
    Location: Faure Island is located in Shark Bay, 13km east of Monkey Mia

    More information

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