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    12020: Whole farm nutrient mapping

    Whole farm nutrient mapping will be conducted on over 200 farms as part of this project. Courtesy Department of Agriculture and Food.
    Whole farm nutrient mapping will be conducted on over 200 farms as part of this project. Courtesy Department of Agriculture and Food.

    Phosphorus (P) losses from rural and urban sources are a major contributor to poor water quality on the coastal plain. The greatest threat is from agriculture, particularly beef grazing.

    Phosphorus inflows and eutrophication will continue to increase if corrective action is not taken. 

    Recent soil testing programs show that 63% of pasture paddocks across south west WA have high P status whilst suffering other constraints. This represents an unnecessary water quality risk and economic impost.

    The Western Australian Government has developed a Fertiliser Partnership and Water Quality Improvement Plans in key catchments to address this issue. Improved rural nutrient management is a key strategy in those plans.

    This project will:

    • undertake whole farm nutrient mapping on over 200 farms, assessed against soil test standards
    • improve nutrient management through workshops and training for farmers, partners and contractors
    • utilise FertCare to train, accredit and assess advisors and to train farmers and professional fertiliser spreaders in AccuSpread accreditation, and undertake spreader calibration
    • develop a range of standards, tools and protocols to facilitate and catalyse a transition of whole farm nutrient mapping to the non-government sector to encourage its use as standard business practice in grazing industries.
    Investment: $ 1 000 000
    Delivery organisation: Department of Agriculture and Food
    Project duration: November 2012 - June 2015
    Location: Vasse Wonnerup, Peel-Harvey; Leschenault; Swan Canning; Scott River; Lower Blackwood and Wilson Inlet catchments

    More information

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