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    12037: Project dieback – action and opportunities for protecting biodiversity assets

    Samples of soil suspected of containing dieback are taken for analysis to assist in the development of risk models. Courtesy Department of Parks and Wildlife.
    Samples of soil suspected of containing dieback are taken for analysis to assist in the development of risk models. Courtesy Department of Parks and Wildlife.

    The relentless invasion of south-west forests, woodlands and heaths by dieback (Phytophthora cinnamomi) has reached the stage that an urgent and well-coordinated response on a landscape scale is required.

    This project will set a state dieback management and investment framework that will identify priority protection areas across the south-west. The collaborative approach in developing the framework will ensure a unified approach to dieback control and result in landscape-scale management of dieback across all land tenures.

    On-ground activity in year one of the project will focus on existing high priority areas including protection and eradication/treatment.

    Once the investment framework is completed and approved by all stakeholders it will be used to determine the locations of future activities with an emphasis on protection.

    The Dieback Information and Management System (DIDMS) will be used to underpin standardisation of dieback data. This will facilitate the standardisation of dieback management systems, for application across all land tenures. Locations and goals of management for priority areas will be made readily available to the public.

    Project staff will work with land managers, with an emphasis on local government, to inform, educate and train them in the management of all aspects of dieback control.

    Investment: $ 3 000 000
    Delivery organisation: South Coast Natural Resource Management Inc.
    Project duration: October 2012 - June 2015
    Location: Susceptible dieback prone areas across the State
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