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    12062: Kalamunda Phytophthora dieback interpretation and invasive species control

    “Phytofighter 1000” Phytophthora dieback hygiene control station in Kalamunda National Park. Courtesy Shire of Kalamunda.
    “Phytofighter 1000” Phytophthora dieback hygiene control station in Kalamunda National Park. Courtesy Shire of Kalamunda.

    Dieback and weeds have been identified as the biggest threats to reserves in the Kalamunda area.

    Reserves addressed by this project cover 60 hectares of remnant bushland up-slope of the Kalamunda National Park. They have been identified as a priority for management and contain important feeding and roosting habitat for Black cockatoos and many other important local native species.

    This project aims to protect the reserves and their surrounds through identification and control of dieback and invasive weed species.

    Dieback interpretation and mapping will be undertaken to identify priority areas for management and these areas will be treated through this project.

    The Shire will also conduct a community education program that will:

    • promote dieback awareness through the local media
    • visit private landholders to provide information and demonstrate dieback control techniques (stem injections)
    • hold a community education workshop about dieback as part of the 'Bush Skills for the Hills' workshop series
    • advertise for volunteers to start a friends group to help care for Hill Street Reserve.

    Weed control and revegetation works will focus on areas of vegetation in best condition.

    Investment: $ 14 873
    Delivery organisation: Shire of Kalamunda
    Project duration: December 2012 - December 2013
    Location: Hill Street Reserve, Ledger Road Reserve and Nimbin Road Reserve in the Shire of Kalamunda
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