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    12076: Pilbara freshwater fish education project: A field guide and underwater documentary

    Indian short-finned eel are the only eel species that live in fresh the waters of the Pilbara. Adults may remain in the freshwater environment for more than 20 years before migrating to the sea to breed and then die. These and many other freshwater fish species will be protected by this project. Courtesy David Morgan, Murdoch University.
    Indian short-finned eel are the only eel species that live in fresh the waters of the Pilbara. Adults may remain in the freshwater environment for more than 20 years before migrating to the sea to breed and then die. These and many other freshwater fish species will be protected by this project. Courtesy David Morgan, Murdoch University.

    Freshwater fishes of the Pilbara (including Australia's only blind cave fish) exist in some of the harshest environments in Australia, relying on refuge pools or groundwater maintained perennial streams to survive during the severe dry period.

    Dewatering operations and groundwater abstractions associated with major resource developments occurring throughout the Pilbara have the potential to dramatically alter these habitats.

    Other threats include the potential of the introduction of pest fishes (e.g. tilapia and guppies).

    To help protect freshwater fishes of the Pilbara this project aims to:

    • produce a field guide of the freshwater fishes of the Pilbara
    • create an underwater documentary on the fishes of the region in partnership with ENVFusion Films
    • conduct a community education campaign in collaboration with Rangelands NRM Coordinating Group, targeting stakeholders including traditional owners and school students.
    Investment: $ 35 000
    Delivery organisation: Murdoch University
    Project duration: February 2013 - June 2014
    Location: Pilbara (or Indian Ocean) Drainage Division of Western Australia, which includes all inland waters between the DeGrey River in the north, to the Irwin River in the south.

    More information

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