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    12082: Planting feed species for Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo in the Moora and Koobabbie important bird areas

    Children from Saint Joe’s Primary School in Moora help plant seedlings for Carnaby’s habitat along the Moore River. Courtesy Rachel Walmsley, Moore Catchment Council.
    Children from Saint Joe’s Primary School in Moora help plant seedlings for Carnaby’s habitat along the Moore River. Courtesy Rachel Walmsley, Moore Catchment Council.

    The rare and endangered Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo is an iconic conservation species that generates great interest among local residents and tourists to the Moore Catchment area.

    The Moora and Koobabbie 'Important Bird Areas' support up to 60 and 32 breeding pairs of Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo.

    Birds are attracted to these areas during the breeding season because there are suitable nesting hollows. Sadly, breeding pairs often struggle to successfully rear chicks because of a shortage of suitable food sources close by.

    This project aims to improve the breeding success of the cockatoos by planting native food-source species close to the nesting sites. Salmon gum seedlings will also be planted to increase the number of nesting trees in the long term.

    Investment: $ 45 000
    Delivery organisation: Moore Catchment Council
    Project duration: December 2012 - December 2013
    Location: Moora and Koobabbie Important Bird Areas, near Moora and Coorow

    More information

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