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    12098: Distribution and abundance survey of Aboriginal medicine tree along the Fitzroy River

    Freshwater mangrove stems are coppiced and measurements taken of regrowth to help determine sustainable wild harvest levels. Courtesy Kieran Richardt, Natura Pacific.
    Freshwater mangrove stems are coppiced and measurements taken of regrowth to help determine sustainable wild harvest levels. Courtesy Kieran Richardt, Natura Pacific.

    Freshwater Mangrove, Barringtonia acuteangula, known as 'Mudjala' in the Nyikina language, has cultural, spiritual and amenity value to the Nyikina Mangala Aboriginal people. They have used the plant for generations as a fish poison and traditional analgesic medicine.

    The Nyikina Mangala people wish to develop a sustainable rural enterprise based on this plant, in a way that ensures its protection into the future.

    The Jarlmadangah Burru Aboriginal Corporation, in partnership with Griffith University, will determine sustainable wild harvest levels and protocols that will underpin a Sustainable Wild Harvest Management Plan of the Freshwater Mangrove.

    The project will also build the capacity of the Nyikina Mangala Aboriginal ranger group in vegetation mapping and natural resource management.

    Investment: $ 50 000
    Delivery organisation: Jarlmadangah Burru Aboriginal Corporation
    Project duration: January 2013 - August 2014
    Location: Along a 50km frontage of the Fitzroy River adjacent to Mount Anderson Station

    Major project achievements

    • Training in ecological survey methodologies provided to Nyikina Mangala Aboriginal Rangers
    • Scientifically robust surveys conducted and integrated with remote sensed data yielding estimates of the distribution and abundance of Mudjala trees in the study area
    • Maps showing distribution and abundance of Mudjala trees in the study area produced
    • Monitoring data collected on the regeneration rates following coppicing and pollarding of Mudjala trees in the study area
    • Sustainable Wild Harvest Management Plan produced
    • Detailed technical report produced
    • Strong partnerships with Rangelands NRM, Kimberley Land Council Aboriginal Ranger Program and other stakeholders achieved

    More information

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