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    13003: Planting feed species for the endangered Carnaby's black cockatoo in the Northern Swan Coastal Plain Important Bird Area

    Carnaby’s feeding on native vegetation in Redfield Park, located just off the Lancelin Road. Courtesy Michael Mullany.
    Carnaby’s feeding on native vegetation in Redfield Park, located just off the Lancelin Road. Courtesy Michael Mullany.

    Carnaby's black-cockatoo is a threatened species endemic to the south-west of WA.

    Populations have declined by fifty per cent over the past 45 years and their total numbers are estimated at less than 60 000.

    The Northern Swan Coastal Plain Important Bird Area in the south of the Moore catchment supports up to 15 000 Carnaby's in the non-breeding season and a small number of breeding pairs.

    Cockatoos are attracted to the area by remnant vegetation containing foraging habitat of Banksia heath and woodland, scattered Marri and Tuart trees and Pinus species.

    This project aims to increase forage habitat as well as community awareness and participation in conserving this iconic bird species.

    Project activities include:

    • establishing 10ha of new forage habitat on private and public land
    • providing land managers with native feed species plants, and guidance on how and where to plant them on their property
    • holding an information event in Gingin to raise awareness of the plight of Carnaby's black-cockatoo and show residents how to identify feed species
    • encouraging community participation in the cockie counts coordinated by Birdlife Australia.
    Investment: $ 45 000
    Delivery organisation: Moore Catchment Council
    Project duration: January 2014 - March 2015
    Location: Northern Swan Coastal Plain between Gingin and Guilderton

    More information

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