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    13023: Management of pigs and foxes in the Ellen Brockman region

    Apples, plums and mangoes have proved atractive to pigs of all sizes - even larger pigs and big boars have taken the bait. Courtesy Ellen Brockman Integrated Catchment Group.
    Apples, plums and mangoes have proved atractive to pigs of all sizes - even larger pigs and big boars have taken the bait. Courtesy Ellen Brockman Integrated Catchment Group.

    Feral Pigs and foxes are having big impacts on the biodiversity of the Chittering Valley.

    Feral pigs are fouling waterways, uprooting native flora and creating bogs along the Brockman River.

    Feral foxes are increasing in number and their impact on insects and small native animals, including long necked and western swamp tortoises, is very significant.

    This project aims to reduce feral pig and fox numbers to manageable levels to give local wildlife a chance to recover and flourish.

    Trapping, baiting and shooting activities will be undertaken in the area from Julimar State Forrest to Boonannarring Nature Reserve - including Wannamal, Chittering and Needonga Lakes.

    Investment: $ 46 900
    Delivery organisation: Ellen Brockman Integrated Catchment Group
    Project duration: February 2014 - October 2014
    Location: Pigs will be controlled in the southern catchment areas of the Ellen Brook and Brockman River and in the Chittering Valley and Chittering Lakes System. Foxes will be controlled in the area from Wannamal West Road in Wannamal to Lewis Road in Chittering.

    Project partners

    Chittering Landcare Group; Chittering Valley LCDC; Department of Parks and Wildlife; WWF; Local landholders; Perth Region NRM

    More information

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